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shift products that are vital to our way of life. be abundant and affordable supplies of energy from shale oil both natural gas and oil are driving job creation and economic growth clear across the country. .. producing more domestic energy provides opportunity for the u.s. to increase exports and serve new market. the recent new economic consulting study from the department of energy concludes an exporting is a net benefit in all scenarios evaluated and more exports increase those benefits. just a few years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. an
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
energy to shift away from fossil fuels and toward clean energy, like wind and solar, but we still have a lot of work to do, particularly on coal exports from queensland. i know in the u.s. be of similar issues with the power vested interest in politics. the u.n. climate talks will continue, countries will continue to make incremental steps, but we will not achieve the really genuine significant deep cuts in carbon pollution until we are able to get to work to do an even stronger movement for climate justice in 2013. >> the u.n. climate summit will be taking place in poland, and massive -- the country massively reliant on coal. australia is the world's largest exporter of coal, the most carbon in tins of fossil fuel. the guardian rights, australians for an average of slightly more carbon per capita than the citizens of the u.s. and more than twice as much as the people of the united kingdom. anna rose, talk about the state of the environmental movement. as you say, nothing will happen until the people push their so- called leaders, but has this massive catastrophic heat wave in australi
and there is energy the in that unity. that is new york at its best. that is new york fulfilling its potential. that is new york fulfilling the dream. that is new york the laboratory of the american experiment of democracy. that is new york honoring the lady in the harbor, the statue of liberty who holds the torch and says you are all invited. i don't care the color of your skin or how much money you have in your pocket. you come here and we will invest in you, work with you, and we want you to do well. we'll educate you. we'll give you health care because we believe in community. we believe when you are raised we are all raised. that is new york at its finest. so my friends, what is the state of new york state? the state of new york state is that new york state is rising. new york state is rising because it's more unified than ever before. new york state is rising to build back better and stronger than ever before. new york state is rising to build a smarter, stronger state than we ever had before. new york state is rising with a passion and a commitment to make this state better than it's ev
these four schools. each exhibits a new energy and renewed sense of purpose and more schools are lining up to be transformed in the years ahead. of course, reform could not be complete without supporting our teachers. they have dedicated their lives to our children. for the first time in a very long time, we're dedicating new resources for them as well. we know success is possible. we have seen it paired with a cooperative effort where every voices heard, we are going to replicate it in classes around our state. the bottom line is, students will be better prepared for school today and for the job market tomorrow. [applause] when it came to energy, our state had been a national leader for years in the worst possible way. we had the highest electric rates in the continental united states. rates that are squeezing the budgets of families and businesses. we came together and decided we needed a plan to take these problems head on. we realized our economic, environmental, and economic needs were all related, and that the path we chose would impact our economy in the state for years to come. con
, untenable energy costs, and natural disasters the likes of which our generation had never seen. and then, in december, just when we thought the worst had happened -- it actually did. the people of connecticut, the communities you represent, and all of us in this chamber when tested, we met those challenges head on. we did as our forefathers did, as our grandparents and parents taught us. we dug in. we banded together. we decided to focus not on what makes us different, but on what makes us the same our common humanity. it is this core strength and spirit of community that brought us together to accomplish so much on behalf of the people of connecticut. two years ago, we faced the single largest per-capita deficit in the nation. it was a problem decades in the making. we knew that getting our fiscal house in order was critical to creating jobs. connecticut employers needed a responsible and predictable partner in state government. we came together and passed a balanced budget. we cut more than we added in new revenue. and even after revenues came in short as they did in 31 other states
is continuing to improve. europe seems to be stablizing, and energy prices are steady. big companies at home and abroad are flush with cash and looking for reasons to invest. on the negative side, the recent tax increases resulting from the fiscal cliff deal will hit successful small businesses hard, which will dampen growth and hurt job creation in the first part of the year. as illustrated by the chamber's latest survey of small business members, there is a -- which you should have at your places, there is significant uncertainty over health care, regulations, taxes, and deficits. last week's jobs report was mediocre. only 63% of our eligible work force is even participating, and we don't see much improvement in unemployment through the year. so while our economy may be growing, it is fragile growth and not nearly strong enough to create jobs americans need or to expand their incomes. and now, we face a series of new washington deadlines over the deficit spending, the debt ceiling, sequestration, and a continuing resolution to keep the government running. we also face another domestic and
energy. those two got upgrades. that is why you see up arrows. hess up for example, 1%. deutsche bank upgraded them to buy from hold. lori: thank you, nicole. we have new evidence sanctions against iran are starting to hurt even as the nation refuses to rein in its nuclear program. melissa: turns out flat rate is going up. what you need to know as the usps raises prices again. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, aner any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorn
up about three points right now. the sectors that are showing strength are staples, energy and technology. back to you. connell: thank you. dagen: the controversial topic of video games and nonviolence. so the government regulate this industry? connell: the chief executive officer of apple says china will some day be his company's biggest arc appeared we will talk or about that as well. speaking of going global, look at some of the currencies around the world. we will be right back. ♪ [ malennouncer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i casave
advocates should be restricted. some blue language for green energy advocate al gore from his employees at current tv. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. >> bret: now fresh pickings from the political grapevine. in the friday followup, al gore soon to be ex-employs with harsh language for their boss. we told you the green energy advocate is telling the cable station to al-jazeera funded by the oil-rich country of qatar. how did the staff of current tv take the news? well, not so well. the "new york post" reports the meeting was heated. and there was a notable absence. al gore hims
hate it when you say that. but look, bonds offer very little value. i use lindco and lind energy as an example. versus some of the real estate investment trusts. medical and health care. there's a lot of bond alternatives. you don't have to be stopped. >> even a dividend yielder like j & j. >> j & j is so undervalued. stock up 7% to 8% last year? with a stroke of a pen they could get that stock to 80, just by breaking it up. put together by someone who, frankly, i know is revered, weldon. there's no reference here for it. >> what is the ten-year -- what is the yield on the ten-year have to get to before we decide that the great rotation is in the midst of happening from bonds to stocks? >> i would have told you when a dividend -- >> now? >> when we thought the tax was going to go to 40%, i would have said, you know, it goes up a half a percent, that's fine. but look, dividends were preserved. we never talk about how big that was, the dividend -- >> enormous. >> it's led to a lot of buying in the last few days. people said, oh, i've got to sell those stocks. even the worst ones ha
're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented these new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the term of smart building. roughly 40% of the carbon emissions t
it wasn't, but it precipitated this energy that came from north africa, syria, for a flood of young people who came into iraq. >> sean: and we'll have the truth behind the general's rolling stone interview that ended his career in an abrupt fashion and finding bin laden and general stanley mcchrystal was in that operation and he says there were missed opportunities in pakistan. and the general goes behind the scene on the hunt for the world's most wanted terrorist and the change he brought to the counter insurgency fight. >> i'm coming here to listen to my commanders and afghan partners, this is all part after listening tour. one thing i'm talking to them about is discussing the way we conduct counter insurgency. the cultural shift is to go from what we were raised as in many cases toward conventional war and kinetic options to remembering we're really here to win the population and sometimes an indirect or a softer approach is operationally more effective than might be more traditional. i think we'll all continue to work toward it, i can't predict, but i believe we're doing the right thin
, continuing our transformation and energy, grabbing the energy sources of the future and dominating them and developing energy independence. but these things are going to require the appropriate priorities and those are reflected in budgets. if all we do is rachet down, you know, essentially close the government down for all intents and purposes so that we're not attending to these things, we're going to have a much less good future so how that debate comes out is important. but there are other issues, immigration reform this very important gun dekbats we're having. the, you know, how we effectuate the transition in health care to the health-care reform. there are a lot of issues on which you know, we have to get it right. and he is going to provide the leadership that we need to get it right i believe. >> here's one issue. theodore roosevelt talked about the bully pulpit where it was used. we saw another issue of bill clinton at the convention with the ca passit ot explain and the president began to call him the explain never chief. are there limitations on this president's ability to m
, when he gets a sense of misdirection for the activities, the energies, where he's going to put places, he probably ends up wasting a lot of opportunity and missing opportunities. but that's a course for him to work out. i'm retired from freedomworks. they will have to work out their business on their own terms. >> what is the fight within freedomworks? what's the fight? tell us -- tell the outsider who is not a tea party person, not a freedomworks person, what is all this noise coming out of the tea party movement, especially freedomworks? what is the fight about? >> first of all, understand the tea party movement is so much larger than freedomworks. freedomworks has been a very important part. what i'm anxious for is for freedomworks to once again be that organization of activist volunteers working across the country with a clear set of ideas, principles, policy objectives, and focusing their energy on that so that we can have a contribution to the kind of results we had in the election year of 2010. i believe the organization has gone adrift from that. i'm excited for the possibilit
is short lived. >>> if you're taking steps to make your home more energy efficient, you're not alone. in tonight's health alert how steps to save on energy costs can actually make indoor allergies worse for the family, especially in the winter. between remodeling older houses and building new ones it's estimated millions more homes in the united states will become more eco friendly over the next four years, but in our efforts to save money and protect the environment we've created a few unintended consequences. >> for every solution there's a problem. so energy efficiency is really, really important. at the same time what's staying in the house is staying in the house. >> reporter: dr. nathan robinovicz says asthma rate in the u.s. have nearly tripled since 1970, a problem he believes begins at home. the doctor recruited students to carry air monitors several weeks at home and to and from school. after analyzing the quality of the air they were exposed to 24 hours a day, the worst is where you may least expect it. >> the amount of pollution that they were being exposed to was higher
. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was on
, it just -- the energy around this place, and we were lucky enough to feel it, this took place over the road from us, was extraordinary. >> three powerful pictures. one, first stood in silence and prayed. second, the 60,000 on the international plaza lifted a shout. you might have heard that in the building. >> heard it where i live. >> it shook heaven and earth. third, the great beam of light representing our hope to shine a light on slavery shot three miles in the sky. i knew it was coming. most people didn't. it took my breath away. it's that visual symbol, instagramable moment. you can't tell someone in four seconds what's going on with slavery in the world but you can show them that image of 60,000 little lights and one giant light, and that can begin the conversation of saying, we're waking up and we want to do something about it. >> yeah. i admire you and the energy and the work that you guys are doing. keep it up. good to see you. >> thank you. >> the found of the passion movement. an extraordinary gathering, too. if you're in atlanta around that time of year, check that out
or the government wants new buildings to go green, giving energy back to the grid and recycling your own water. >> welcome back. we are picking up a few showers here in central africa across parts of the coastal regions. take a look at the forecast map for the next couple of days. we don't expect anything to be too heavy. lagos be just out of the rain. for parts of libya, especially coastal libya, showers. a disturbance across the mediterranean. benghazi, anywhere along these coastal areas, we expect light rain towards saturday. about 18 degrees is what we expect toward alexandria which will also be getting showers as well. cairo, a high temperature of about 20. near europe, it will be quite messy as systems come out of the northeast. this one system making its way across central europe. another one across germany. the forecast map looks like this toward saturday. snow across parts of the alps as well as heavy rain across parts of germany. london will be mostly cloudy for you, a little warm" >> top stories here on al jazeera, venezuela's information minister says president hugo chÁvez has a s
coming in. as you can see, less energy. in terms of sectors here. most major names with big moves up last week. energy financials for example, look at sectors. all modestly to the down side today. i think the important thing that's interesting here is that materials are weak here. dollar is down today. that normally helps metal stocks. as you can see, none of them are doing much. but reporting in the next couple of days. want to know, gold stocks having a tough day here. harmony had to shut down mines in south africa because of strikes going on there. gold stocks still not performing very well. we will have an expert on at 1:30 eastern time to talk about the outlook for gold in 2013. >> welcome, good to see you, let's focus on the earnings season kicking off. you wrote about it a little bit this morning on your note. is that a real concern right now? >> i think it is. they prepared us, kind of investors for a weak fourth quarter. they have been talking about it for a while so it shouldn't be too much after surprise. i think the surprise will be the extent of really how bad it'll be, right
demand is growing, the oil price may act as a break in the world economy. the energy revolution will have a global impact in oil flows toward asia. and the global shift is underpinned by huge energy investments. we are going to be talking about u.s. energy. >> yeah -- exactly. we're also seeing reports about how u.s. oil import will be at the lowest in 25 years. there is a change afoot. >> i guess that's what the iea head is saying, asia is going to take more of the u.s. demand. >>> to earnings. yes, alcoa swung to a fourth quarter profit matching forecasts. results were helped by stabilizing raw aluminum prices. higher prices and cost cutting. revenues down 1.5% to $5.9 billion. that did beat estimates. alcoa is also slightly boosting its 2013 global demand forecast from 6.5% to 7%. kleinfeld says growth in china is coming back and europe is doing better than expected. the stock up 1.3% in after hours. in frankfurt, up 1.72%. join for the first hour, for the first time this year, charlie diebel. hello. good to see you. right. here we are. we've kicked off earnings season. what do you mak
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
fiscal cliff vote either the energy or the responsibility or the sense of family ties, if you will, to the northeast republicans to make the kind of explanation that chris shays is talking about. he just blew them off. and that sent a big message -- >> that may be more of the story -- >> what? >> the more to the story may be john was concerned he wouldn't even get 85 votes to get this bill passed if he had included the northeast aid. i mean, we just don't know certain things that were happening -- >> but he didn't say anythi of t on that night. my point was he didn't care enough -- >> i bet -- >> i want to go -- >> -- about conversations he had with the president and so on. i happen to think john boehner is -- deserves more credit than he's getting. >> i like boehner, too, but i think he's overwhelmed by the right. we grew up in a country where there was claf ford case from new jersey, hugh scott in pennsylvania, schweiker from pennsylvania and you can wiker from connecticut and ed brook from massachusetts and up and down the -- all these republicans from the northeast. they're blo
and there's a benefit but in this study the benefits of economic development, energy security in our continent far outweighs the risk. melissa: even if we do harvest this natural resource, do you think that the study shows we need to be more careful about how we're doing it? >> always. it is always a learning process. melissa: yeah. >> fact that they found it, now they can work with the industry, find technology perhaps to reduce things. if his speculation was we do more it will get worse. that is speculation and work with industries to find the right technologies to make sure it doesn't. but at the end of the day, our economy, world runs on fossil fuels, 80%. it is not going anywhere. do it safely. melissa: can't run the world economy without question. what impact of this study do you think? it is getting a lot of attention. that is why we're doing it. >> i saw it all over the place, and the word carcinogens. if you have a a barbecue steak, the same chemicals found deep in the mud are the same chemicals you will be eating on the barbecue. certainly this is the kind of issue that get
the president keeps doubling down. we got another $12 billion to be spent on wind energy alone this year. it is a failure. nothing has happened with wind energy. we haven't created that many jobs. only 48,000 jobs in the wind industry but we're subsidizing it to the tune of $12 billion this year. >>steve: that is something you have railed on your program and this channel as well that the government is trying to pick winners and losers. >> the government should not be doing that. this is the end point of the government trying to pick winners in green energy. it's an ideological program. the left says we've got to have green energy, so we subsidize it. we try to pick winners and losers. >>brian: it will be great when it works. we have skilled people, scientists that have been working on this technology, trying to make it come true. in comes the chinese money as they buy the company and they also get the scientists. so they're going to be working on this leading-edge technology that could be converted to military tepbl for -- military technology for another country. >> we have lost our mone
on arms export including more information to this committee. so we have set about it energy energeticly. i'm pleased over progress we made over past year. >> thank you. i want to start with a couple of specific questions pointing to more general and you recently talk abouted cooperation accord and the giving a history of human rights abuses u.k. government have any misgivings about dealings with this accord? what does the accord cover and interests, [inaudible] >> well this, we signed this on the 11th of october and this provides a framework for current and future defense activity including training and capacity-building with bahrain and, partly in order to enhance the stability of the whole region and as the committee will be aware we have defense assets of our own stations in bahrain. our mine sweepers in particular which are responsible for in any crisis, for freedom of navigation in the gulf. they are based there, physically based there in bahrain. so we need to regularly update and amend that defense cooperation arrangements. we have a long history of defense engagement with bahrain s
job investments. the tax credit you mentioned which supports clean energy jobs. if this had been allowed to expire as many as 37,000 clean energy jobs could have been lost. mortgage debt relief which protects home owners from paying taxes on forgiven deat and bonus depreciation. so going back to the first point this package of tax extenders was supported on a buy partisan basis. the president supported it but you would have to spend disbelief to accept the premise that republicans did not. >> is there a moment that the president sat down with senator hagel and offered him the job and had a hart to heart talk about what direction he would like to see the pentagon move in? >> the president did taufer senator the job over the weekend by phone. they have a long relationship that dates back to their service together nth senate. they travelled together abroad and senator hagel after he left the senate was co-chair of the president's intelligence advisory board. so they have had an ongoing conversation about this nation's national security needs and the president's policies in the last
are on pace to produce more than 50,000 jobs a year with those in degrees in food, and environmental energies. >> as more students are finding out, it isn't just about plows and cows. today it focuses on healthy eating, locally grown foods and specialty crops that will help address the long-term challenge of feeding the world. >> schools with working farms like uc davis offers class necessary ranch management, animal science, farm law and more. 21-year-old adrian bradley means an ag degree means good pay even for entry level jobs. >> my best friend just started at $48,000 a year in agriculture in agribusiness. >> experts predict by 2050 the world's population will exceed 9 billion people. a sobering projection that calls for boosting global food production by 70%. agriculture leaders say today's current crop of ag students are driven by that challenge. in davis, california, claudia cowen, fox news. >> thousands of faithful christians filling the streets of ma tried, celebrating the traditional end to the christmas season. beautifully decorated floats, clowns and marching bands took to the par
...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> i believe that that government shutdown actually gave us the impetus as we went forward to push towards some real serious compromise. i think it drove bill clinton in a very different direction, a very bipartisan direction, in fact, we passed welfare reform. these are good things, we also balanced the budget for the first time in 40 years in 1997, 8 and 9. and when i left we had over a $230 billion surplus, this was with a democratic president. >> so you think it is a good idea? >> yes, i think it is about time. >> no, not a good idea, republican congressman of arizona, not a good idea at all. look, this is not '95. we're not talking about a government shutdown. we're talking about the united states of america going into default. the most powerful economy in the world saying our political system, our system is too disfunctional for us to reliably pay our bills. that would be anything but good for this country. if congressman salmon had been with m
of injuries and what sort of energies and what are the source of the injuries? it kind of reminded me in a meeting yesterday. i was around in the 1970's. the only guy who can remember this -- i hope i am not insulting him -- is ray lahood. he remembers the auto industry. he remembers the whole question of traffic safety and highway safety. there was a big fight when i first got in the senate that began in the late 1960 fell through early 1970's. the automobile industry did not want to allow the department of transportation to acquire statistics on the type of accidents that occur. they were not able to literally acquire the information. because the concern was it would lead to calls for some rational regulations for the guardrails for automobiles. i remember when we finally broke through and the department of transportation started keeping misinformation, they found out -- if my memory is correct -- the vast majority of drivers -- the steering wheel damage to their solar plexus, penetrated their upper body cavity, damaged their heart. the reason the industry did not want us knowing th
,000 to lobby for a wind energy tax credit. possibly the biggest player here was capital tax partners, capital one and goldman sachs among the big banks that paid the firm $2.2 million, and another $700,000 to keep the tax depreciation down low. and another $490,000 from movie producers. >> cenk: now all the turks are here, but if you don't watch the show none of them are turkish. this is bribery. they paid $2.2 billion and get $11 billion back in one of the cases. am i seeing this wrong or this is obviously legalized bribery. >> yeah, definitely, but how is it different from what we see over and over again. >> what is different these are all for industries that will create jobs. without these tax breaks the jobs wouldn't be available. that's the argument being made. in some cases that's true, but in rare cases is that true. >> cenk: corporations made the same argument in 2004 when they wanted a repatriatation tax holiday. they wanted to bring in their profits from overseas. after their brought in their profits that were taxed at 5% rather than 35% they cut jobs in america. wow, i didn't see t
, the investments that they make, tand clean energy jobs that they create. and 2 million americans who are out of work will continue to receive unemployment benefits so long as they are actively looking forward a job. but all this was just one step in the broader effort to grow our economy and shrink our deficits. we still need to do more. and our economy can't afford more protracted showdowns or manufactured crisises along the way. because even as our businesses created 2 million new jobs last year including 168,000 new jobs last month, the brinchingsmanship in congress made business owners more uncertain and consumers less confident. we know there is a path forward. last year i signed into law 1.7 trillion in deficit reduction. this week's action further reduce it is deficit by $737 billion making it one of the largest deficit reduction bills pass i by congress in over a decade and i'm willing to do more. i believe we can find more places to cut spending without short changing things like education, job training, research and technology, all of which are critical to our prosperity to a 21st
to austin and had you stop, texas. >> a lot of that driven by the energy sector and technology sector and again we are expecting to see that 10ed growth in the years to come. >> and subject of jobs former senator chuck hagel of nebraska likely to be nominated at secretary of state next week after obama returns from vacation in hawaii according to the wall street journal. >> white house released picture of president obama as he was being briefed about the shootings in newtown, connecticut right after it happened last month. as you can see mr. obama appears to be very somber as he spoke with deputy national security advisor john brennan about this. president later said during a television interview that was quote the worst day of his presidency. >> another point an moment captured by the white house president obama present add purple heart hours after he was hit by aneurysm ed in afghanistan. improvised explosive did he advice. haig seems to be asleep or unconscious. president white period and with eyes still closed sergeant haig as you see here reached his hand out to shake with t
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